CLAD team

Prof. Susan Waldron

Susan Waldron on FieldworkSusan holds a personal chair in biogeochemistry in the School of Geographical & Earth Sciences at Glasgow University. She has a longstanding interest in carbon cycling, firstly through environmental controls on biological production in methane, then as an energy flow in ecological studies, and now in budgetary constraints and process recycling in lotic and lentic systems. Previous research on the influence of peatland gas production on peatland hydrology, on field vegetation respiration studies and on freshwater invertebrate functional plasticity reflects the diversity of her interests in the carbon cycle.

She has published one of the first peer-reviewed articles to examine the impact of large-scale catchment disturbance due to infrastructure development, specifically here the activities associated with Whitelee windfarm construction, on export of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nutrients.

Prof. Dave Gilvear

Dave GilvearDave is a Professor in the School of Biological & Environmental Sciences at Stirling University. His research group focuses on the understanding of river and floodplain systems from a hydro-geomorphological perspective. Areas of interest include river channel change, wetland hydrology, instream flow requirements, instream and floodplain vegetation patch dynamics and the application of airborne remote sensing to river and floodplain environments. Currently research includes, airborne remote sensing of river corridors, geomorphic response and biotic recovery of engineered channels, instream flows and habitat hydraulics, floodplain landscape diversity, developing hydrogeomorphic protocols for impact of beaver re-introduction, and the hyporheic zone. .

With Dr Ian Grieve he has published one of the first studies examining the impact of windfarm development on hydrological export of DOC at the Braes of Doune.

Dr. Ian Grieve

Dr Ian GrieveDr Ian Grieve is an Honarary Senior Research Fellow in the School of Biological & Environmental Sciences at Stirling University. His current research interests lie in two fields, the chemical composition of stream and soil waters with particular reference to dissolved organic carbon and the controls of organic matter, soil structure and soil erosion with particular reference to upland soils.  

With Prof Dave Gilvear, he has published one of the first studies examining the impact of windfarm developement on hydrological export of DOC at the Braes of Doune.

 

Dr. Simon Drew

Picture of Simon DrewSimon is the Network Coordinator for CLAD. He orignially trained as a Marine Biologist but undertook an MRes at Edinburgh University and studied food webs in the bog pools of the Flow Country at Forsinard. His PhD examined long term changes in the coastal ecosystems of the Baltic Sea driven by nutrient change using sediment core data. Following this he spent two years in the environmental consulting industry working on a number of projects including environmental monitoring of offshore and onshore windfarms, water quality monitoring, and the identification of the first offshore marine special areas of conservation in the UK.